News

On this National Library Workers Day, AFSCME library workers deserve to be recognized for the value they bring to ou

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is getting a big promotion.

Georgia Veiga has been a proud member of AFSCME New Jersey Local 3440 for the last 17 years.

It is with a heavy heart that I share with you the passing of longtime Sister Mary Ann Bishman. She was the Secretary for Local 3142 for more than 40 years.  

She was an officer, steward, mentor and friend for many. She was on the negotiations team for Council 5 for many contracts and was a strong voice and advocate for female members.   

Union 101 – Union Meetings: Why you should have been there.

How many times have you seen that our union is having an important meeting? Maybe you saw a flier about it or maybe someone shared it on Facebook.  Either way, you made a mental note to try to attend, but then life intervenes and you never make it.  Come Friday, you ask the steward what happened at the meeting, and he usually snaps “if it is so important for you to know, you should have been there.” 

As the world marked the anniversary of the official start of the coronavirus pandemic Thursday, President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan into law and offered words of hope to a weary nation.

AFSCME President Lee Saunders praised the House of Representatives for passing the American Rescue Plan on Saturday and urged the Senate to follow suit as soon as possible.

There is good news for AFSCME members looking to pursue higher education. AFSCME Free College has made its bachelor’s degree completion program a permanent benefit.

That means that AFSCME members and their families can earn a bachelor’s degree for free, making an even wider choice of career options a possibility for more people.

Here’s a sure sign of new leadership in Washington. There’s a renewed push to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour, an idea that went nowhere when the Trump administration and anti-worker members of Congress were in power.

The coronavirus pandemic won’t be controlled until states, cities, towns and schools – and particularly health departments – have the funding they need from the federal government, says AFSCME Retiree Sue Conard.

Conard should know. She spent 24 years as a public health nurse serving Wisconsin’s La Crosse County. One of her many areas of expertise? Immunization.

The U.S. Conference of Mayors has sent a letter to Congress that echoes what AFSCME has been saying for months: It’s long past time to robustly fund the front lines.